Posts Tagged ‘apps’


Websites and Apps from NYSCATE 2013 Presentation

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

Here is a list of websites and apps demonstrated during my session at NYSCATE 2013.

EngageNY.org: where you can download the full curriculum modules for free.

commoncore.org: access Eureka, the interface for the full math curriculum modules.

Number Pieces (Free): Virtual Base 10 blocks and whiteboard

AL Abacus ($1.99): Virtual abacus, sometimes called a Rekenrek

10 Frame Fill (Free): Basic ten-frame game/app.

Virtual Manipulatives! (Free): Fraction, decimal and percentage tiles

Teaching Table ($2.99): Smartboard-like manipulatives and interactivity for math presentations

Number Bonds: Addition & Subtraction to 99 ($1.99): Number bonds app for composing and decomposing numbers

Bugsy Kindergarten Math ($2.99): Fun game to practice K-1 skills

Splash Math website & apps ($9.99 per grade level): Adaptive Common Core-aligned math practice, with individual users

Numberland ($2.99): Montessori-based early numbers practice

Marble Math ($2.99): Game-interfaced math practice with choice of levels & subjects

Hands-on Equations ($4.99): Learn to solve for a variable step-by-step from concept to procedure

Thinking Blocks (All apps free): Solve word problems while making models interactively

Conceptua Math: Online tools and curriculum for math. Very strong for fractions.

Common Core Standards Viewer (Free): Interactive Common Core standards viewer with flow from one to the next

 

 

Let’s Write a Comic!

Saturday, July 6th, 2013

Would you like a fun summer writing project to do with your child? Why not create a comic?comic

Comics and graphic novels are legitimate forms of art and writing, and for visual people, they can be more accessible or relatable. And they require thought and good design to be interesting.

This spring, a girl I’ve been tutoring in writing for years made one with my help. First, we wrote the storyboard. Then we laid it out in ComicBook!, an iPad app, with dialogue embedded in bubbles we would edit later to fit the photos. Finally, we took the photos to fit the storyline, editing them with effects to make them look like a comic book.

Not only was the student completely engaged every step of the way, but her younger brother was almost addicted to the process. If we didn’t produce a page that week, he pestered her all week until our next session.

We completed the comic in our last session of the summer, and her parents agreed to let me post it here for your enjoyment. Please leave a comment if you would like to know more about the process, or if you create one of your own!

View or download The Danger of Being Bored! here (PDF, ~9 MB).

        
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